BioBuF

Increased production of chemicals from renewable domestic raw materials, instead of using fossil resources, constitutes an important step towards a bio-based economy. The BioBUF research project aims at investigating innovative technologies and processes to achieve this goal.

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Today’s chemical industry is, to a large extent, dependent on fossil resources. These resources are not only finite but using them also contributes significantly to global warming. Highly ranked on society’s list of priorities is, therefore, finding alternatives to fossil raw materials.

BioBUF is a five-year project where researchers, together with industry, investigate new opportunities to use renewable domestic resources to produce bulk and fine chemicals. The renewable resources in focus are forestry residues and microalgae.

In BioBUF, the holistic perspective is important. Therefore, the project not only assesses the specific technologies needed to convert the biomass to demanded products. It also investigates possible process layouts for full-scale implementation as well as integration with existing industry in order to achieve maximal economic as well as environmental benefits.

Towards sustainable production of adipic acid

Towards sustainable production of adipic acid

The global annual production of adipic acid is currently three million tonnes. It is mainly derived from fossil oil and the byproduct, nitrous oxide, is a very powerful greenhouse gas. The production is, thus, anything but sustainable. Emma Karlsson, a PhD student at Industrial biotechnology at Chalmers, is on the track to find a sustainable solution for adipic acid production.

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BioBUF algal scientists have success with highly downloaded review

BioBUF algal scientists have success with highly downloaded review

We set out to write a review that didn’t just discuss how algae production work in general, but instead focused on how it can become more viable through integration with industry and outputs from other processes. In particular, we considered requirements for nutrients, water, carbon dioxide and heat, which are all essential for algal cultivation and have a large bearing on the impact and cost of production at large scales.

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